The Other Self: Selfhood and Society in Modern Greek Fiction by Dimitris Tziovas

By Dimitris Tziovas

The opposite Self is the 1st English-language, book-length literary research of a few of the main celebrated Greek novels of the 19th and 20th centuries. A needs to learn for a person attracted to Greek literature and tradition, it bargains either a high-quality advent to trendy Greek literature and shut examining of person texts. writer Dimitris Tziovas specializes in the problems of id, autobiography, and social determinism raised in those texts.

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The collective historical experience that served as common ground is fading away; linguistic registers proliferate, cultural differences become prominent and as a result the bond between the writer and the general public becomes tenuous and precarious. The writer ceases to act as the symbolic embodiment of collective visions or generational anxieties and gradually loses the role of the symbolic spokesman. The transition from orality to textuality or visuality that is taking place in Greece entails the transition from the writer to the readerhpectator.

94. 45. Cf T. S. Eliot’s view that “poetry has primarily to do with the expression of feeling and emotion; and that feeling and emotion are particular, whereas thought is general. It is easier to think in a foreign language than it is to feel in it. ” See “The Social Function of Poetry,” in On Poetry and Poets (London: Faber & Faber, 1957), 19. 46. According to Ong, op. , p. 74, “Writing and print isolate. ’ . . ” National Imaginary, Collective Identity, and Individualism 25 Greek culture, by being primarily an oral culture, fostered the expression of collective experience in literature and until recently writers wrote with a more or less homogeneous national audience in mind, an audience which could easily understand and identify with what they were reading.

National Imaginary, Collective Identity, and Individualism 25 Greek culture, by being primarily an oral culture, fostered the expression of collective experience in literature and until recently writers wrote with a more or less homogeneous national audience in mind, an audience which could easily understand and identify with what they were reading. As Greek society becomes increasingly individualized and diversified, the literary audience is also gradually fragmenting and diversifying and this results in writers having to acknowledge the fact that they are writing for a larger but less homogeneous audience.

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